movies

I’m Mad As Hell Speech From Network (1976)

I have already spoken about how strangely prophetic many of the finest speeches in Cinema now feel, most notably in my last post about Charlie Chaplin’s amazing monologue from the Great Dictator.

However, you could not talk about unforgettable scenes and speeches in Cinema without mentioning the 1976 movie Network that still resonates today. Network is about a TV news anchor called Howard Beale who is played fantastically by Peter Finch and with low ratings, breaks down on national TV and announces he will commit suicide live on air.

Wandering from the script, the character ignores the teleprompter and lets out all of his frustrations of the world in which he lives before ranting “I’m as mad as hell and I’m not going to take this anymore!” and urges all viewers to open their windows and do the same.

Once again this speech feels more relevant now than its release nearly 40 years ago and seems to predict the world we live in today which is filled with reality TV, tabloid journalism and the overwhelming direction that media in general is taking with its “anything for ratings” philosophy.

The Character Howard Beale gave the following speech in Network that still resonates today.

“I don’t have to tell you things are bad. Everybody knows things are bad. It’s a depression. Everybody’s out of work or scared of losing their job. The dollar buys a nickel’s worth. Banks are going bust. Shopkeepers keep a gun under the counter. Punks are running wild in the street and there’s nobody anywhere who seems to know what to do, and there’s no end to it. We know the air is unfit to breathe and our food is unfit to eat, and we sit watching our TVs while some local newscaster tells us that today we had fifteen homicides and sixty-three violent crimes, as if that’s the way it’s supposed to be.

We know things are bad – worse than bad. They’re crazy. It’s like everything everywhere is going crazy, so we don’t go out anymore. We sit in the house, and slowly the world we are living in is getting smaller, and all we say is: ‘Please, at least leave us alone in our living rooms. Let me have my toaster and my TV and my steel-belted radials and I won’t say anything. Just leave us alone.’

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The Charlie Chaplin Speech from The Great Dictator (1940)

Ask most people what they know about Charlie Chaplin and they will probably respond with “Silent Movie Actor” but  ironically his most powerful performance contains quite possibly the finest speeches in the history of cinema.

In this digital age of CGI and summer blockbusters, it often feels like older cinema is not only under appreciated, but can also feel irrelevant or uninteresting to many movie goers in these celebrity obsessed times, but the incredibly powerful monologue from arguably Chaplin’s finest hour, feels more relevant now than it did in 1940 and feels strangely prophetic.

As soon as you hear the words “Our knowledge has made us cynical; our cleverness, hard and unkind. We think too much and feel too little. More than machinery, we need humanity. More than cleverness, we need kindness and gentleness.” You cannot help but see the parallels of 1940 and 2014, where ultimately we all want the same thing, but sadly despite the advances in technology, we really haven’t progressed very far in nearly 75 years since the film’s original release.

Paulo Nutini also referenced this amazing speech in his track Iron Sky where towards the end of the song, the familiar speech begins

The misery that is now upon us is but the passing of greed, the bitterness of men who fear the way of human progress. The hate of men will pass, and dictators die, and the power they took from the people will return to the people. And so long as men die, liberty will never perish. Don’t give yourselves to these unnatural men machine men with machine minds and machine hearts! You are not machines, you are not cattle, you are men! You, the people, have the power to make this life free and beautiful, to make this life a wonderful adventure”

If you are reading this and can spare 5 minutes, I strongly urge you to soak up this scene, which I promise will overwhelm you and certainly make you question how far we have progressed as a society, but be warned you may even shed a tear.

Here is the full Speech from The Great Dictator (1940) by Charlie Chaplin

The Jewish Barber (Charlie Chaplin): I’m sorry but I don’t want to be an emperor. That’s not my business. I don’t want to rule or conquer anyone. I should like to help everyone if possible; Jew, Gentile, black men, white. We all want to help one another. Human beings are like that. We want to live by each other’s happiness, not by each other’s misery. We don’t want to hate and despise one another. In this world there is room for everyone. And the good earth is rich and can provide for everyone. The way of life can be free and beautiful, but we have lost the way.

Greed has poisoned men’s souls; has barricaded the world with hate; has goose-stepped us into misery and bloodshed. We have developed speed, but we have shut ourselves in. Machinery that gives abundance has left us in want. Our knowledge as made us cynical; our cleverness, hard and unkind. We think too much and feel too little. More than machinery we need humanity. More than cleverness, we need kindness and gentleness. Without these qualities, life will be violent and all will be lost. The aeroplane and the radio have brought us closer together. The very nature of these inventions cries out for the goodness in man; cries out for universal brotherhood; for the unity of us all. (more…)

Movie Trailer Voice Legend Hal Douglas Dies at 89

Growing up it felt like every movie I ever wanted to see had a trailer voiced by the same gravely voiced guy and just like one of those trailers “In a world with no internet…one man began a search that would last a lifetime” Tragically, I only found out the answer to this question after I learned that the voice of thousands of movie trailers Hal Douglas has passed away aged 89.

It seemed that every film in the 80’s and 90’s had that familiar voice on the trailers and it always puzzled  me that despite having  the most recognisable voice in Hollywood, he was equally almost completely anonymous at the same time.

Who could forget the Warner Brothers trailer for Letha Weapon in 1987 as Hal began “He was ready to retire…now he’s gonna wish he had

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GUorM4nTX7k (more…)

Popcorn Time – Netflix for Pirates, Torrents For Dummies…

We all know that the traditional method of watching TV is dying; busy lifestyles determine what we want to watch and when we want to watch it. This change in attitude from viewers has seen services such as Netflix flourish and maybe even see the downloading of content via torrents slightly decline.

Do you really want the hassle of downloading illegally and the cumbersome process of transferring your dodgy files by plugging your device via a USB cable, when for only £5.99 a month you can view as much as you want  and not be labelled a thief in the online community by your fellow digital natives.

The only downside is that it can take a while for up-to-date content to make it across to whatever service you subscribe to. However, Popcorn Time has arrived on the scene and this new open source BitTorrent-powered movie streaming app for downloading and watching movies, can probably be best described as Netflix for Pirates or even Torrents for Dummies. (more…)

A Journey Through Philip Seymour Hoffman’s Lifetime In Cinema

Writer, editor and director Caleb Slain has created something quite special entitled, P.S. Hoffman (A Tribute),which is a memorial to actor Philip Seymour Hoffman that showcases the entire library of his work. After the emotional montage piece at the Oscars a few nights ago, we were all once again reminded of the magnitude of Hoffman’s work and this is a perfect way to revisit his finest moments.

This 20 minute film is entitled “A post-script journey through Philip Seymour Hoffman’s lifetime in cinema” is a timely reminder of his legacy.

Caleb is quoted as saying “200 hours of work went into breaking down 47 of Hoffman’s films. Compiling his legacy has been one of the most challenging experiences I’ve ever faced as an editor, and yet indescribably rewarding. I can assure you that after 22 years on screen and nearly fifty films, we now look at the work of an actor who never had a single dishonest moment on camera. I know because I’ve seen them all. Please take a breather and raise your glasses to one of our greatest.”

For anyone wanting to hunt down some of the lesser known titles in the list, there is a list of all the featured works contained in the video at the end of this post.

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